Microsoft updating


07-Jan-2017 05:11

"I wasn't terribly happy," recalls Beattie, adding that he now has a habit of explicitly running Windows Update a few hours before his presentations "just to make sure it's not going to spring any surprises." Alex Gibson, a 3D printing consultant, says he no longer trusts Windows to manage his 3D printer after his computer forced a restart near the end of a 6-hour-long print job for a customer in November. Lydricsama, a digital artist from Finland, says she lost hours of work on a commissioned piece she was working on late into the night, leaving her with a bare sketch (instead of a mostly lined and colored illustration) after her machine forced an update back in October.

She tells me that while it was her fault for not saving the document more often, Windows also didn't help: "I had no prior warning before it restarted itself." Luckily, her client didn't mind the delay.

Microsoft has posted an out-of-band security update to address a remote code execution flaw in its Malware Protection Engine.

Redmond says the flaw, dubbed CVE-2017-11937, has not yet been exploited in the wild.

If you're really unlucky and Windows is installing a major update, the progress meter may be a tease: Once it reaches 100 percent, your computer might reboot a second or third time before you finally get control again.

I've personally seen this -- or something similar --happen five times over the past year. There's software developer Dylan Beattie, whose laptop decided to shut down while he was giving a talk in front of 200-odd developers in Malmo, Sweden, and found he had to wing the rest of the presentation without his slides.

That's pretty much the direction I've been leaning in recent months.

And after hinting there might be a Mac Book purchase in my immediate future, I asked a Microsoft spokesperson if the company was doing anything about forced updates.

The out-of-band update comes just days before Microsoft is scheduled to post its December security updates with the December 12 Patch Tuesday release.Mark Switzer, who goes by the handle Preheat when he plays World of Warcraft, also had his machine restart at a particularly inconvenient time last month.He was in the middle of beating the game's final boss in front of a live Twitch audience.But because Windows had recently downloaded some updates, my computer decided it would be a good time to It was the first of three occasions that a forced Windows update would totally destroy my workflow at a critical moment -- once crippling my computer when I had a hot scoop to share with the world.

Then, Windows 10 came along to add insult to injury.For example, an attacker could use a website to deliver a specially crafted file to the victim's system that is scanned when the website is viewed by the user," Microsoft explains."An attacker could also deliver a specially crafted file via an email message or in an Instant Messenger message that is scanned when the file is opened.According to Microsoft, the vulnerability can be triggered when the Malware Protection Engine scans a downloaded file to check for threats.